Roman and Byzantine Near East
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Roman and Byzantine Near East Recent Archaeological Research by J. H. Humphrey

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Published by Journal of Roman Archaeology .
Written in English

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  • Business/Economics

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL12181973M
ISBN 101887829148
ISBN 109781887829144

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Book, Print, Conference in English The Roman and Byzantine Near East: some recent archaeological research [general editor, J.H. Humphrey]. Ann Arbor, MI: Journal of Roman Archaeology, > v.: illustrations maps, colored plates ; 29 cm. Related Links. Full text available from HathiTrust.   The Byzantine and Early Islamic Near East: Elites Old and New (Studies in Late Antiquity and Early Islam) [Lawrence I. Conrad, Lawrence I. Conrad, John Haldon] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Byzantine and Early Islamic Near East: Elites Old and New (Studies in Late Antiquity and Early Islam)Format: Hardcover.   J. H. Humphrey, ed., The Roman and Byzantine Near East: Some Recent Archaeological Research, vol. 1 ().. 1. Alla Kushnir-Stein, “The Predecessor of Caesarea: On the Identification of Demetrias in South Phoenicia”: The city of Demetrias, attested only on coins, was the Seleucid name for the city of Strato’s Tower, a well-established polis that Octavian gave to Herod, . The Roman Near East makes it possible to see rabbinic Judaism, early Christianity, and eventually the origins of Islam against the matrix of societies in which they were formed. Millar's evidence permits us to assess whether the Near East is best seen as a regional variant of Graeco-Roman culture or as in some true sense oriental.

This volume series presents a collection of critical analyses of the structure, historical development, and composition of the elite strata of late Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic societies in the eastern Mediterranean basin. Elite culture and elite strata in societies leave an unmistakable record in the literature and in the visual and material culture of the world. The purpose of the present book, then, is to provide a sharp contrast—perhaps a bit too sharp at times—between the Roman West and the Byzantine East, between the Church of Romeand the Eastern Orthodox Churchesfrom which the Roman Catholic Churchemerged and to which it was once so closely bound as a Church of OrthodoxMartyrs, Saints, and. The Roman and Byzantine Army in the East, Proceedings of a colloquium held at the Jagiellonian University, Krakow in September , ed. by E. Dabrowa, Jagiellonian University, Institute of History, Krakow Preface Abbreviations List of Participants 1. M. Baranski, The Roman Army in Palmyra: a case of adaptation of a pre-existing city 2. E. First century B.C. mosaic of a dovecote tower found in Palestrina 3 near Rome (Biblical Archaeology Review) Recent work at the site of Shivta in the Negev documents Roman/Byzantine pigeon towers that were abandoned after their collapse in an earthquake and examines the role of pigeons in the ancient agricultural systems of this arid region.

Two sieges of Amida (AD and ) and the experience of combat in the late Roman Near East / Noel Lenski Naval operations during Persian expedition of Emperor Julian ( AD) / Edward Dąbrowa ʹAmr Ibn ʹAdī, Mavia, the Phylarchs and the late Roman Army: peace and war in the Near East / . Surveying a millennium of Roman and Byzantine rule in the Near East, from Roman annexation to the Arab conquest, the book outlines Syria's crucial role in Roman history. Topics discussed include the Roman army's use of Syria as a buffer against its powerful eastern neighbors and the elaborate road system that Rome developed to connect its far. Roman Syria and the Near East offers a broad overview of this major cultural crossroads. Surveying a millennium of Roman and Byzantine rule in the Near East, from Roman annexation to the Arab conquest, the book outlines Syria's crucial role in Roman history. This book presents a series of critical analyses of the structure, historical development, and composition of the elite strata of late Roman, Byzantine, and early 4/5(2).